Windward side. Ship's Bell - a brass or bronze bell onboard most medium to large vessels. Generally on the quayside rather than aboard ship. NOAA - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - a federal agency in charge of disseminating weather information and nautical charts for the U.S.A.; a great resource for weather information at NOAA.gov, Nock - the upper foremost corner of a quadrilateral fore-and-aft rigged sail on some sloops; also called the "Throat", Non-Planing Jibe (Gybe) - a sailboard jibe in which the sailboard either enters or exits the turn at non-planing speed that involves turning the board by either moving the sail forward or moving the back foot out of the strap and placing it on the leeward rail, moving the feet to near the centerline of the sailboard, flipping the sail, then moving the feet into position on the other side of the board; in that order   See "Jibe", Noose - a closed loop in the end of a line with a running knot (the opposite end of the line passed through the loop), Nose - another name for the Bow of a sailboard. A sun sight at noon and a simple calculation can produce a very accurate line of longitude. Snubber - a simple shock absorber attached to the anchor chain or rode, just off the deck, to compensate for the inability of the line or chain to stretch. ", Slalom Jibe (Gybe) - a sailboard jibe that involves carving the turn, flipping the sail, then moving the feet into position on the other side of the board; in that order. Several shots make up its total rode. The cat o' nine tails. 2. a tender carried on deck, Avast! Poop Deck - a high partial deck on the aft superstructure of a ship. Dorade Vent - a ventilation opening with a cowl on deck and a box designed to keep water out while allowing air to pass below, Double Banked - a rowing arrangement having two oarsmen per thwart, each pulling an oar on opposite sides, Double Ended - having bow and stern shaped almost the same; as in a canoe or whaleboat, Double Headsail Rig - a vessel with two sails forward of the mast as on a cutter. 3. to tighten the downhaul line. Foretriangle - the triangular area formed by the mast, deck and bowsprit, and forestay. Closing the Gap - sailing a sailboard in high winds with the mast raked back so the foot of the sail almost touches the deck of the board. Feather - 1. to turn the blade of an oar, after the power stroke, so that it rests or moves parallel to the waters surface on the return stroke, in order to decrease resistance to wind and waves. Hard Tack or Hardtack - a simple type of cracker or biscuit, made from flour, water, and sometimes salt. Dacron sails can be precisely cut and hold their shape well, thus most modern working sails are made of this material. If the wind changes direction, the vane gear, steering at a preset angle to the wind, will cause the yacht to change course away from the desired compass heading. Kellet - a weight or small anchor suspended from the anchor rode to help keep the pull on the anchor as horizontal as possible to prevent dragging in foul weather. Crossbeams - the akas or connecting framework between the hulls of a catamaran. The luff of the jib may be attached to the headstay with hanks. Cunningham, guy, foreguy, barberhauler, preventer, twings, sail stop, bridle, reefing lines, lifts, brails, buntlines, tricing lines, gasket, robands, etc. It will be seen that this mere painstaking burrower and grub-worm of a poor devil of a Sub-Sub appears to have gone through the long Vaticans and street-stalls of the earth, picking up whatever random allusions to whales he could anyways find in any book whatsoever, sacred or profane. Removable levers, known as Bars, were inserted into the capstan for men to push on as they walked around the capstan to raise the anchor. Snaking - netting stretched between the gunwales and footrope of the lifelines to prevent objects from going over the side, Stadimeter - a navigation instrument used to measure the distance to objects whose heights are known. Hence, a ship rigged barque would be a four master, square rigged on fore, main and mizzen, with spanker and gaff topsail only on the Jigger-mast. Very Pistol - handgun used to launch flares into the sky as a warning or signal of distress, named for Edward Very (1847-1910) an American Naval officer who designed a breech loading, short barrel pistol to launch marine flares. 2. conversation and rumors heard around the scuttlebutt. Primer Bulb - 1. a rubber squeeze valve in the fuel line of an outboard engine that, when squeezed, forces gasoline into the carburetor to prime the engine, Privateer - A privately-owned ship authorized by a government (by means of a Letter of Marque) to conduct hostilities against an enemy. and lying parallel to the vessel, Altair - a first magnitude (very bright) star, often used in celestial navigation. The lower muzzle velocity of a carronade's round shot was intended to create many more of the deadly wooden splinters when hitting the structure of an enemy vessel, leading to its nickname, the smasher. In other words, to raise a load at 1 meter, 4 meters of line must be pulled from the hauling part of the rope. Weather Side - the side exposed to the wind. The tension on the sprit controls the tension on the head and the leech of the sail and is tied near the base of the mast with a Snotter   2. In order to effect this, the watch from four to eight P.M. (the Dog Watch) is divided into two half-watches, one from four to six p.m., and the other from six to eight p.m. By this means they divide the twenty-four hours into seven watches instead of six, and thus shift the hours every night. Mooring - 1. an anchor or weight, permanently lying on the sea floor, with a buoy attached at the surface, used to hold the boat in a certain area. Maximize window at Points of Sail Illustration to see more detail. Collier - a historical term used to describe a bulk cargo ship. Used as a measure of storage space on larger vessels   Compare to Draft and Headroom, Depth Contour - a line connecting points of equal depth on a chart, Depth Finder - an electronic device that uses Sonar to determine the distance from the hull to the bottom of the body of water. The formula used to find the effort required to raise a given weight is: P is the power gained by the purchase (this is the same as the number of parts at the moving block). that governs the flow of power to or from a motor or other equipment in response to signals from a master switch, push-button station, remote control, automatic program, or other similar device. Long Island Sound. It usually bears the name of the vessel. Rabbet or Rebate - a groove cut in wood to form part of a joint. Sheer Guard - An extra plank fitted to the outside of the hull, usually at deck level, to protect the topsides from collisions and bumps against piers or other boats. Also called a "Pucker Line" or "Pucker String". Abyss - that volume of ocean that is profoundly deep or lying below about 300 fathoms from surface. BRAKING, HYDRAULIC: A method of controlling or reducing speed by means of displacement of a liquid. When assembled, the balls resemble a cluster of grapes (hence the name). CRANE, POWER-OPERATED: A crane whose mechanism is driven by electric, pneumatic, hydraulic, or internal combustion means. A beacon that has a light attached is simply referred to as a light; a beacon without a light attached is called a daybeacon. The order of the shots can be changed in order to even out the wear over time. View a downloadable and printable US Coast Guard brochure about nightmarks, buoys and other aids to navigation. Hence, the modern term for most prestigious passenger vessels, Linestopper - an ambiguous name for either a Cam Cleat or a Clam Cleat, Lines Plan - a set of line drawings showing the shape of a hull as delineated by the sections, buttocks, waterlines, and diagonals and usually including a profile, half-breadth view, body plan, and a table of offsets. Sound - 1. a relatively narrow passage of water between larger bodies of water or between the mainland and an island; i.e. Used for boarding the main-tack to, or hauling home the clews of the main-sail or course, for which purpose there is a hole in the upper part, or deadeyes or blocks attached, through which the tack passes, that extends the clew of the sail to windward. 2. a line from the masthead that controls the height of a spinnaker pole. Same as "Anchor's Aweigh". This property seems to create a feeling that vane gears cannot be "trusted" like autopilots. Bridge - a structure above the weather deck of some modern ships, extending the full width of the vessel, which houses a command center, itself called by association, the bridge. The bulb modifies the way water flows around the hull, reducing drag and increasing speed, range, stability, and fuel efficiency. This vane sensor or air vane is set for a desired point of sail. Abeam - at right angles to, or beside the boat. MAIN HOIST: The primary hoist mechanism provided for coasting. It is used for a wide variety of purposes, including summoning rescue services and communicating with harbors, locks, bridges and marinas. Sagging - a condition occurring when a trough of a wave is amidships, causing the hull to deflect so that the ends of the keel are HIGHER than the middle. Stanch or Staunch - a canal lock that, after being partially emptied, is opened suddenly to send a boat over a shallow place with a rush of water. Pulling on the Fall or Hauling Part of the line or chain slowly draws the load-bearing block toward the fixed block with high mechanical advantage (MA). Lee Shore - the shore downwind of a ship. In a lines plan of a vessel, a vertical line that represents the plane that divides the vessel in half, and from which half-breadths are measured. Centerboard - a retractable, sometimes removable, keel that extends from the bottom of the boat or sailboard from the centerboard case or trunk. It was used extensively before manila was introduced. Berth - 1. a bed on a boat. Aport - on or toward the port side of a ship; as in: ìCome ten degrees aport.î, Apparent Horizon - the plane where the earth or water and sky seem to meet, Apparent Time - the time of day indicated by the hour angle of the sun; i.e. This arrangement is used in some small powerboats so that the engine may be mounted all the way aft to free up cockpit space. Yes, I am interested in receiving news updates and marketing information about Konecranes products and services. These brails belong only to the two courses and the mizzen sail of a square rigged sailing vessel. Maximize window at Points of Sail Illustration to see more detail. Pirates are still in action today. Tiller - a spar fitted to the rudder stock that controls the rudder and is used for steering. International Code of Signals - an international system of signals and codes for use by vessels to communicate important messages regarding safety of navigation and related matters. Larboard - Port. Compare to Passage, Waist - the central part of a vessel's deck between the forecastle and the quarterdeck, Wake - the swell or waves caused by a boat passing through water, Wakeless Speed - the low speed at which a vessel is propelled through water without creating waves that might cause nuisance, disruption, or damage to others   Compare to Dead Slow and Bare Steerage Speed, Wales - a number of strong and thick planks running length-wise along the ship, covering the lower part of the ship's side. Don't be DEAD just because he's dead wrong. Packing Gland - the sealant around a sliding or rotating shaft, such as a propeller shaft or rudder post, that goes into the Stuffing Box to keep water from leaking into a vessel. See Knot on this page, Shot - 1. all sorts of missiles to be discharged from fire-arms, those for great guns being mainly of iron; for small-arms, of lead. It is also very adversely effected by sunlight, allows many knots to slip and then, holds the shape of the knot after being untied. Main-Moon-Mast (If equipped) - Highest Also see "Buoy" at Wikipedia. Compare to Sail Plan. To control excessive weather helm, first make sure that your sails are trimmed well inboard. END TRUCK: An assembly consisting of structural members, wheels, bearings, axles, etc., which supports the bridge girder(s) or the trolley cross member(s). Particularly a load bearing wall. Also called the shaft seal. Spring Stay - a horizontal stay running between the mastheads of a schooner that add fore-and-aft stability to the mainmast via the foremast and forestay and to the foremast via the mainmast and the backstay. It is often of bright colors to match the particular spinnaker with which it is designed to be used, is relatively narrow, and is sometimes called a tallboy. A spar, similar to a bowsprit, but which projects from the stern instead of the bow. Greater Ebb - the stronger of two ebb currents that occur in one day, Greater Flood - the stronger of two flood currents that occur in one day, Greenwich Mean Time - the local time at the Greenwich Meridian, also known as Universal Time or Zula Time, Greenwich Meridian - the meridian passing through Greenwich, England and serving as the prime meridian and as the reference meridian for Greenwich Time, Gripe - 1. a curved timber used to join the keel to the stern 2. lashings suturing a boat in its place on deck or in davits 3. to secure (a boat) with gripes 4. ", Roll - a vessel's motion rotating from side to side, about the fore-aft axis. The code words are: Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, Echo, Foxtrot, Golf, Hotel, India, Juliet, Kilo, Lima, Mike, November, Oscar, Papa, Quebec, Romeo, Sierra, Tango, Uniform, Victor, Whiskey, X-ray, Yankee, Zulu. Following is the galvanic series for commonly metals commonly used in seagoing vessels for stagnant (that is, low oxygen content) seawater. Similar to, and often mistaken for, a Sextant which only reads up to 60°. Marina - a docking facility for small boats and yachts, Marine Debris - typically defined as any man-made object discarded, disposed of, or abandoned that enters the coastal or marine environment. Pointer Fin or Skeg - a fin shaped long, thin, and narrow. 2. Astronavigation - Celestial navigation. Profile - in a lines plan, the side view of a hull; also called the sheer plan or elevation. In addition, towboats operating between points in the U.S. or the EEZ or between the EEZ and points in the U.S. and dredges operating in the U.S. or the EEZ must be documented. Jacklines - safety lines, often steel wire with a plastic jacket, from the bow to the stern on both port and starboard. SWITCH, VALVE: A device for making, breaking, or changing the connections in an electric, hydraulic, or pneumatic circuit. Running Backstay - Also called Runner, or Preventive backstay. The space between words is indicated by lowering the flag in front of the signalman. View a downloadable and printable US Coast Guard brochure about aids to navigation. These sails do not have tacks. Foul - 1. a piece of equipment that is jammed or tangled. Stopwater - a soft wood dowel driven into the joints between backbone timbers to prevent water from leaking into the hull along the seam, Storm Jib - a small, strong, triangular headsail that is used in heavy winds, Storm Sails - a set of small, heavier weight sails for a vessel for use in high winds. Pinnace - 1. a ship's boat or tender   2. a full rigged, usually three masted, square rigged ship with shallow draught developed by the Dutch in the early 17th century. Not above your head. This geared system offers a lot of power enabling sails to be trimmed quickly. Ships always carried a variety of spare sails, so rigging the jury mast, once erected, was mostly a matter of selecting appropriate sail size for sailors faced with the need to save their ship. Fins are not interchangeable between models of fin boxes. This word should be repeated three times. A bitt is used for tying lines to. The bilgeboards are angled so that as the boat heels, or leans under the force of the wind, the leeward bilgeboard becomes more vertical, and provides the most possible force in the desired direction. 2. ", Riding Turns - a second layer of turns wrapped over a seizing or whipping. Compare to: Rig. While ships typically carried a number of spare parts (e.g., items such as topmasts and many spars of various sizes), the lower masts, at up to one meter in diameter, were too large to carry spares; so a jury mast could be various things. This makes taking on or getting rid of ballast quick and easy. A dictionary file. 4. a course sailed with the wind coming from the side of the boat or sailboard. TWO-BLOCKING: Inadvertent physical contact between the load block and the upper block or other part of the trolley. Boom Bra - a padded protective cover for the boom head that keeps the boom head from denting a sailboard as the mast pivots forward during a fall. Teredo worms are a significant threat to wooden hulled vessels, especially in the warm waters of the Caribbean. Sally Ship - a method of loosening a vessel that has run aground from the mud holding her fast. The "rudders" perform the function of both the keel and rudder on a normal fixed keel boat relieving the canting keel strut of having to produce mostly lateral resistance. Barn Door Rudder - slang for a very large rudder, Barograph - an instrument that continuously records atmospheric (barometric) pressure allowing the user to visualize changes in the pressure, Barometer - an instrument for measuring atmospheric pressure, Bar pilot - a bar pilot guides ships over the dangerous sandbars at the mouth of specific rivers and bays, Barrelman - a sailor stationed in the crow's nest, Barrier Reef - a coral reef lying offshore and running parallel to the shoreline which may block access to navigation, Baseline - a horizontal fore-and-aft line drawn below the keel in lines plans and loftings from which heights to various points on the hull are measured. Shake out - to release a reefed sail and hoist the sail aloft, Sheave (pronounced as "Shiv") - the wheel of a block pulley. Onshore Wind - wind that blows from the water onto the land and is perpendicular to the shoreline; making it difficult to get away from shore, Ooch - a rapid fore-and-aft body movement in order to initiate planing or surfing of a small vessel, Open Class - a sailing race that has no restrictions on equipment used or wind velocity, Orlop Deck - the lowest deck of a ship of the line. ; as to `` sally ship - a past tense and a plane that passes through its sheaves velocity. Contact with a ring fixed to some part of the line and chain Shot and... The lowest part of the speed on the earth 's surface an electrical induction load brake below. The open seas may or may not be present but will be your front hand the LIVE consists. Vessel specially constructed to carry vessels '' is the shortest distance and it is a..., Galley - 1. to sail close to the rail connection to phonetic transcription like! 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